History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of Ulysses S. Grant


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Grant Back to Kids. Grant by Charles River Editors. Choose Store. Or, get it for Kobo Super Points! In Charles River Editors History for Kids series, your children can learn about historys most important people and events in an easy, entertaining, and educational way. Pictures help bring the story to life, and the concise but comprehensive book will keep your kids attention all the way to the end.

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In the 19th century, one of the surest ways to rise to prominence in American society was to be a war hero, like Andrew Jackson and William Henry Harrison. But few would have predicted such a destiny for Hiram Ulysses Grant, who had been a career soldier with little experience in combat and a failed businessman when the Civil War broke out in However, while all eyes were fixed on the Eastern theater at places like Manassas, Richmond, the Shenandoah Valley and Antietam, Grant went about a steady rise up the ranks through a series of successes in the West.

He fights. At the beginning of , Lincoln put him in charge of all federal armies, and he led the Army of the Potomac against Robert E. Lee in the Overland campaign, the siege of Petersburg, and famously, the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox. Although Grant was instrumental in winning the war and eventually parlayed his fame into two terms in the White House, his legacy and accomplishments are still the subjects of heavy debate today. His presidency is remembered mostly due to rampant fraud within his Administration, although he was never personally accused of wrongdoing, and even his victories in the Civil War have been countered by charges that he was a butcher.

Like the other American Legends, much of Grants personal life has been eclipsed by the momentous battles and events in which he participated, from Fort Donelson to the White House. Grant covers the amazing accomplishments of Grants life and career while putting a human touch on the Westerner who rose from virtually nothing to become the most influential general and author of the Civil War, and an important president.

Along with pictures of Grant and other important people, places and events in his life, your kids will learn about Grant like never before. Skip this list. Ratings and Book Reviews 0 0 star ratings 0 reviews.


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No, cancel Yes, report it Thanks! Grant suffered from intense migraine headaches due to stress, and he was often nearly disabled by them. It is thought that much of the rumor of Grant's drinking stem from the misunderstanding of his headaches as signs of "hangover". In fact, when Grant's wife was in camp with him she often tended to her husband's headaches by giving him mustard foot baths and warm compresses for his head.

After his victory at Chattanooga, Tennessee, in , Grant was promoted to the rank of Lt. General of the Armed Forces, a position only ever held by George Washington. This put Grant in overall command of all Union forces. Abraham Lincoln had finally found the general he had been looking for. And I stand by him the rest of the war", said Lincoln. The President assured Grant that so long as Grant fought, he would stay out of Grant's way, support him, and insure he had all the manpower and equipment needed to finish the job. For Lincoln knew, as Grant did, that the objective was not the capture of Richmond, the objective was Robert E.

Lee and the destruction of his Army of Northern Virginia. On this Grant and Lincoln saw eye to eye. He is said to have had a superstition about ever retracing his steps, and for Grant this meant no retreat, and no giving up of ground. He would go out of his way to sidestep, or take any other route, than to fall back. Grant's philosophy of war was one of seizing the initiative, keeping the enemy off balance, and constantly staying on offense with his force's momentum continuing forward. Grant also differed from the other generals that preceded him in one other important way; Grant knew that the objective was not territory, but the Confederate armies themselves.

Whereas other commanders had been concerned with maneuver - flanking enemy armies and seizing cities - Grant knew that seizing a city meant nothing with enemy armies still in the field.

Archeology in the Park - Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site

The only sure way to end the war was to destroy the Confederate Armies in the field and in Grant set out to do just that. In May, , Grant launched an invasion of the south with the intent of luring Lee into the open by moving against the Confederate capitol of Richmond.

Lee anticipated this, and Grant battled Robert E. Lee to a draw in the Wildnerness where, for the first time, the Army of the Potomac marched south after a battle in Virginia, instead of retreating, as all previous Union generals had done. Grant forced Lee onto the defensive, and as William Tecumseh Sherman began his march to the sea, from Atlanta in the west, Grant pursued the Army of Northern Virginia until the siege of Petersburg, which lasted for nine months.

Grant's disastrous assault at Cold Harbor, which left thousands of Union soldiers dead within just half an hour, was the only mistake to which he ever admitted, after the war. No advantage whatsoever, was gained, to make up for the terrible loss of life", said Grant. Though Grant was labeled a "butcher" for this by Mary Lincoln, who despised Grant, whom she thought hard and cruel most historians have pointed out that the losses of Grant at Cold Harbor were no worse than any others, in some cases much less such as "Pickett's Charge" at Gettysburg which was ordered by Lee , than many of the other ferocious battles fought throughout the war.

It is important to point out, at this point, that while Grant has gone down in history maligned as a "butcher" and Lee as a "great general", a simple review of the losses of both armies during each of the major engagements shows, percentage for percentage, Lee suffering equal, or greater, loses than Grant. It is partly on this basis, as well as many other details too numerous to include here, that most civil war and military historians have had a complete reassessment of Grant as both a general, and a tactician, and most have a completely different opinion of him than the reputation that has maligned the man, and which has filtered down to the public through popular legend.

Yet, surprisingly, this change in historical opinion seems to have not done much to change popular public opinion. The myths of "Grant the drunk" and "Grant the butcher", still persist, even today. It is also worth noting that the reputation Grant suffered as both an "alcoholic" and a "butcher" seem to have been ideas vigarously promoted and promulgated by southern historians who had a vendetta, or historians sympathetic to the southern cause, in the years after the war. Even a cursory study of the quotes and opinions of those from Grant's own time, those who campaigned with him, and those who fought against him, will show a radically different opinion of the man, of his generalship, and of his character - almost a complete degree difference in most cases - than his reputation as it has developed in popular public opinion.

See the quotes and ancedotes at the bottom of this page. Lee at Appamattox Courthouse on April 9th, And I would rather die a thousand deaths", said Lee. Lee, understanding that his position of responsibility meant he would suffer the harshest punishment, was prepared to be Grant's prisoner and to be severely humiliated in defeat. Grant, however, understood that reconciliation was the order of the day.

Therefore Lee was stunned at General Grant's magnanamity and his generous terms of surrender. Grant later wrote that he was "depressed at the defeat of a foe who had fought so valiantly", though he believed it was for "the worst cause for which anyone ever fought". Grant refused to humiliate Lee by demanding his sword which Lee had expected he would and he agreed to a parole of Lee and his army.

Grant even offered up 25, rations to Lee's army, which was on the verge of starvation.

History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of Ulysses S. Grant History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of Ulysses S. Grant
History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of Ulysses S. Grant History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of Ulysses S. Grant
History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of Ulysses S. Grant History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of Ulysses S. Grant
History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of Ulysses S. Grant History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of Ulysses S. Grant
History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of Ulysses S. Grant History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of Ulysses S. Grant
History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of Ulysses S. Grant History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of Ulysses S. Grant
History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of Ulysses S. Grant History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of Ulysses S. Grant
History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of Ulysses S. Grant History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of Ulysses S. Grant

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